Terner Center Blog: No Limits

Category Archives: Increasing the Supply of Housing

Why We Need a New Conversation on Rent Control in California, Today.

Posted on by Carol Galante

Leaders seeking to address California’s housing crisis are facing an important challenge: how to take meaningful and significant policy action to “stop the bleeding” of rising costs, eviction and displacement without generating new challenges that will only prolong the state’s deep affordability challenges.

Today’s debate over rent control, and particularly, the movement to repeal Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act (which places statewide limits on how jurisdictions implement rent control), has pushed this challenge to the fore. One side of the debate is working to qualify a measure on the November ballot that would fully repeal Costa-Hawkins, enabling localities to expand rent control in their jurisdictions, in an effort to protect tenants from rising rents and displacement. The other side is concerned that this repeal will disincentivize both ongoing investment in existing rental homes as well as much-needed new construction of new housing. Both sides are gearing up for a full-blown battle over the ballot measure.

The Terner Center believes these two choices represent problematic extremes, and that there needs to be an honest conversation about alternative paths that can meaningfully protect renters without inhibiting investment in existing homes or preventing new homes from getting financed and built. There are a growing number of leaders and stakeholders who agree that this conversation is needed and that an all-or-nothing fight over the current Costa-Hawkins law will be costly and highly politicized and that ultimately, whichever side wins, renters in California will lose.

To inform and stimulate this “third way” dialogue, we have been working to identify potential policy alternatives, engaging stakeholders on the ground, researching models in other states, and thinking through the pros and cons of multiple strategies. In a new brief, we present two ideas: one that provides real protections against egregious rent increases for all Californians via a statewide cap on rent increases, and a second that creates more affordable housing overall via a new incentive program for the creation and retention of Below Market Rate units.

These proposals are not intended to represent the solution to California’s housing crisis, and need not be thought of as in lieu of other renter protection policy efforts or other pushes to expand the supply of housing in the state. And while we believe they are more effective approaches than a full repeal of Costa-Hawkins, they also do not preclude reforms to the law. In the appendix of our brief, we explore a few such potential reforms, such as extending rent control to certain types of single family rental homes, or adopting a “rolling inclusion” to make more units eligible over time. But these proposals are intended to serve as a starting point for a much-needed and urgent dialogue about the true impact of current options on rent control, and ideas for a better path forward.

This dialogue is especially urgent in this moment. If the repeal initiative is not withdrawn from the ballot by late June, all the attention and focus on the repeal effort promises to distract policymakers and confuse voters about other important policy efforts to address the housing crisis in the state, such as the Veterans and Affordable Housing Bond Act of 2018.

We are calling on advocates, policymakers and thought leaders to come together for this dialogue, and help break through the noise of the current binary rent control debate to find a viable, more sustainable option. We need more thoughtful and effective solutions today and look forward to engaging with others to make that a reality.


It All Adds Up: The Cost of Housing Development Fees in Seven California Cities

Posted on by Sarah Mawhorter and David Garcia

In the summer of 2017, the Terner Center embarked on a seemingly straightforward task: determine the amount and type of fees levied on new residential development in seven California cities. What was initially thought to be a clear assignment turned into an odyssey of combing through difficult-to-obtain fee schedules, cobbling together piecemeal information across city departments, and repeatedly interviewing various city planning officials. The onerous and lengthy process our research team faced tells the story of the development fee process in California. While fees act as an important tool to mitigate the effects of new construction, the development and administration…


Perspectives: Practitioners Weigh in on Rising Housing Construction Costs in San Francisco

Posted on by Carolina Reid and Hayley Raetz

It is no secret that producing new housing in California is an expensive endeavor. Our Cost of Building Housing Research Series recently launched with the goal of understanding why this is the case, breaking down the elements of the housing development process to identify key cost drivers and potential private and public sector solutions. Today we are releasing our first brief of the series, which examines rising housing construction costs in San Francisco from the perspective of non-profit and market-rate housing developers, architects, and other practitioners on the ground. The brief shares findings from a series of interviews and focus…


ADU Update: Early Lessons and Impacts of California’s State and Local Policy Changes

Posted on by David Garcia

A multi-pronged approach to alleviating the shortage of housing in California and other high-cost regions is urgently needed. As we have discussed in past research, Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) - built with a small footprint predominantly in under-utilized single family neighborhoods - can offer much needed naturally-affordable supply to the market. In the fall of 2016, the California State Legislature passed a set of bills intended to clear the way for the proliferation of ADUs  in California. Even before these changes were adopted, many leaders at the local level were pioneering policies to make it easier for residents to build…


Scaling Off-Site Production in the United States: Lessons Learned from Swedish Leader Lindbäcks

Posted on by Mark Trainer and Carol Galante

When it comes to innovation in housing, what does the U.S. have to learn from Sweden? More than you might think. Though they have different histories, economies and social contexts, Sweden and the United States share many housing market challenges – including significant barriers to new construction and high cost of production leading to rapidly appreciating housing prices, especially in urban centers. The Terner Center recently published a policy brief providing a detailed examination of the Swedish housing system, and a companion summary outlining key similarities and differences with the United States. And last month, the Terner Center for Housing…


From Small Steps to Giant Leaps: What Must Come Next for the California Housing Agenda?

On Friday, September 15th, the California Legislature approved a package of 17 bills aimed at putting a dent in the state’s housing crisis. While the votes came down to the wire, in the end, the need for solutions won the day, and in the coming weeks the Governor is expected to sign each piece of legislation, officially ushering in the most significant housing policy changes in recent memory. You can read our recap of these bills in an earlier blog post here. Drafting, amending, defending and eventually passing these bills was no small feat, and the legislature, the Governor and…


Modular Construction in the Bay Area: The Future is Now

This post originally appeared on the ULI San Francisco Blog on August 2, 2017. After years of abstract discussions and false starts, modular building may finally be gaining the momentum it needs to make an impact in the Bay Area. Why now? And why here? On Tuesday, July 18, the San Francisco District Council of the Urban Land Institute hosted “Modular Construction in the Bay Area: The Future is Now”, an event moderated by Terner Center for Housing Innovation Faculty Director Carol Galante. The panel discussion featured four leaders committed to bringing this innovative housing method to scale in the Bay Area: Developers Rick Holliday of Holliday…


Jumpstarting the Market for Accessory Dwelling Units

This post originally appeared on the Berkeley Blog on May 23, 2017. It shares insights from our recently released report Jumpstaring the Market for Accessory Dwelling Units: Lessons Learned from Portland, Seattle and Vancouver.   ADU permitting explodes: Permits as a share of all residential permits. How did Portland, Oregon go from permitting two accessory dwelling units (ADUs) per month in 2009 to almost two per day in 2016?  Now, more than one of every ten housing units built in Portland is an ADU. Compared to other housing types, ADUs, or separate small dwellings embedded within single family properties, are…


Highlights from the Terner Center Promoting Affordability Conference

Though U.S. cities like Boston, New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles are important engines of the American economy, their rapid growth in jobs and populations has not been met with a comparable pace of growth in housing. The result? Increasing pressure on both the rental and for-sale housing markets, and skyrocketing costs of living for a larger and larger proportion of the people who live in these cities.  On Thursday June 1, the Terner Center hosted a special convening intended to delve into this issue, exploring solutions to that could help expand the supply of housing, lower the cost…


Building Affordability by Building Affordably: the case for Off-site Multifamily Construction

Posted on by Carol Galante and Sara Draper-Zivetz

To remain relevant and successful over time, every industry must modernize and adapt to changing demands and opportunities in the marketplace. The housing development industry is no exception, and over the years, has experienced its fair share of evolutions and revolutions in business model and product design. Today, as housing developers face rapidly changing consumer preferences, population demands, technological advances, and an ever- rising cost of construction, the adage “innovate or perish” may be timelier than ever. How will the housing industry adapt to these new realities? As a recently released report from McKinsey & Company points out, the construction…